Liebling Haus is open!

Foto: Yael Schmidt

The White City Center

The Max Liebling Haus - a paragon of international style architecture - has been converted from a residential building into a public center, undergoing a process of renovation and conservation. Liebling Haus is a great example of the international style buildings that can be found in the heart of Tel Aviv: a unique urban phenomenon comprising of 4,000 edifices that have earned the White City the title of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 2003, UNESCO declared the White City zone in Tel Aviv as a unique World Heritage Site of the modern movement. The White City Center was founded in an effort to advance the recognition of the outstanding architectural landscape of Tel Aviv, with its collection of over 4,000 buildings built in the international style; an unparalleled global phenomenon.

Foto: Yael Schmidt
Liebling Haus - The White City Center

Headline

The White City Center (WCC) was co-founded by the Tel Aviv-Yafo Municipality and the German government at a historical and cultural crossroad in the heart of Tel Aviv. The WCC's mission is to actively preserve the heritage of the White City site and the international style, known in Israel as the Bauhaus.

The WCC operates at the Liebling Haus on 29 Idelson Street, one of a series of historic buildings erected around Bialik Square, in the area that was once the beating heart of Tel Aviv. Built by Tony and Max Liebling in 1936, it was designed by architect Dov Karmi and engineer Tzvi Barak with distinctive characteristics of the international style; entirely different from the decorated home of poet Haim Nachman Bialik, located around the corner.

Foto: Yael Schmidt
Liebling Haus - The White City Center bei Nacht

Exhibition The Transfer Agreement

The Max Liebling House is one of about 4,000 houses in the “White City”, whose architecture is closely connected to the formal language of the Bauhaus. The use of building materials from Germany is based on the almost unknown Haavara Agreement.

The houses in the “White City” in Tel Aviv (Israel), a UNESCO World Heritage site since 2003, were partly erected of building materials from Germany. The Haavara Agreement, a contract between Zionists in Palestine and National Socialists in Germany, played an important role for this. The exhibition The Transfer Agreement deals with this agreement from an artistic, architectural and political perspective. It will be shown during the Triennale of Modernism at the Bauhaus Dessau.

Foto: Yael Schmidt
Liebling Haus - The White City Center, Treppenaufgang

[Translate to English:] Headline

The controversial agreement between the Jewish Agency, the Zionist Association for Germany and Nazi Germany was valid from 1933 to 1938. It should be an incentive for German Jews to emigrate, by enabling them to transfer part of their property to Palestine. They paid in the property at one of the transfer banks in Germany. Local importers used this money to buy goods in Germany, e.g. building materials, and sold them in Palestine. When the emigrants arrived in Palestine, they got their money back, after the deduction of the cost.  

More than 50,000 German Jews emigrated under the Haavara Agreement. Estimated 150 million Reichsmarks are assumed to have been transferred. A real building boom began, based on this mass of construction material, coining the “White City” Tel Aviv – from cement to tiles. For the exhibition Transfer Conversion in the Bauhaus Building, some of the building materials from Tel Aviv return to Germany.

Foto: Yael Schmidt
Liebling Haus - The White City Center

[Translate to English:] Headline

The Transfer Agreement is a joint project of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation and The White City Center. The exhibition is simultaneously shown in Tel Aviv. The focus of the team around the artists Ilit Azoulay, Lou Moriah, Nir Shauloff and Jonathan Touitou, the curator Hila Cohen-Schneiderman and the monument conservationist Sharon Golan-Yaron is on the concept of the “Societies on the Move”: the move of people, materials and cultures as central element of modern architecture and its influence on urban development. The project will investigate historical and contemporary relations and raise the question for the impact of migration and mobility on individuals, cities and culture while they reshape their identities

Triennal of Modernism

The exhibition transfer agreement will be presented during the Triennal of Modernism in Dessau.

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